Here’s How to Support Puerto Rico as It Recovers From Devastating Hurricane Maria

I am re-posting this article from readersupportednews.org here because it contains valuable information on how to contribute to saving lives of Puerto Ricans and help them recover from the devastation of Hurricane Maria. The links to the sites listed below did not come through when I copied the article into this post. So, please go to the original article at readersupportednews.org to follow the links for donations and information.

Rescue in Guayama_026651-puerto-rico-092617

Rescue workers help people after the area was hit by Hurricane Maria in Guayama, Puerto Rico. (photo: Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Reuters)

By Remezcla

26 September 17

Category 4 hurricane made landfall in Puerto Rico on Wednesday. With winds of about 155 mph (nearly strong enough to be considered a Category 5), Hurricane Maria tore through the island before weakening to a Category 2 storm. (However, Hurricane Maria strengthened to a Category 3 storm as it made its way to the Dominican Republic.) The natural disaster brought torrential rain and flooding and knocked out power to the entire island.

Flooding in Utuado,PR_DK_wB26UEAIhps_

✔@AntonioParis

Starting To receive images from Puerto Rico. My sister just sent me this. It’s from Utuado my hometown. #HurricaneMaria

1:09 PM – Sep 20, 2017

Like many countries in the Caribbean, Puerto Rico was still recovering from the effects of Hurricane Irma, which hit the island about two weeks ago. Immediately after, Puerto Rico began delivering supplies to countries in need. It also welcomed thousands of refugees, whose homes were destroyed by Irma, from the US Virgin Islands. On September 13, about 2,000 from St. Martin and the Virgin Islands made their way to Puerto Rico, according to Reuters.

With the island expected to go without power for months, Puerto Rico now needs our help. The US territory is in the midst of a financial crisis and already struggling in many ways. It’s predicted this storm will have long lasting effects. “Puerto Rico isn’t going to be the same,” lawyer Migdalia Caratini told the Los Angeles Times. “It’s going to be before Maria and after Maria.”

The road to recovery will be long, and we need to stand by Puerto Rico during these trying times. Here are some places you can donate money and time to.

1.     ConPRmetidos
ConPRmetidos is a nonprofit organization committed to the people of Puerto Rico. The group will use the money it raises to help those affected by both Hurricane Maria and Irma. “We anticipate the funds will be used first for immediate needs of food, shelter, and water and then transition to long-term recovery efforts.”

Donate here.

2.     Puerto Rican Leadership Council
On Friday, September 22, the Puerto Rican Leadership Council in Miami will collect supplies, including bottled water, nonperishable food, diapers, and clothing, according to the Miami Herald.

Stop by Friday at one of these locations:

o   Mana Wynwood at 2217 N.W. Fifth Ave., Miami, Florida 3312

o   Isla Del Encanto Restaurant at 12850 S.W. 120th St., Miami, Florida 33186

o   Ana G. Méndez University at 15201 N.W. 79th Court, Miami Lakes, Florida 33016

Contact Luis De Rosa at ldr@puertoricanchamber.com for more information.

3.     Puerto Rican Leadership Council
On September 22, Washington DC Puerto Ricans will raise funds and collect supplies for the United for Puerto Rico fund.
Learn more here.

4.     Caritas Puerto Rico
Launched in 1969, Caritas helps those most in need. Sign up to become a volunteer here.

5.     Emergency Puerto Rico Hurricane Relief Fundraiser
The Puerto Rican Agenda and Segundo Ruiz Belvis Cultural Center are hosting a benefit event on Friday, September 22. There is a $25 entry donation, but the organizations are also accepting money through checks and PayPal.

Learn more here.

6.     New York Drop Off Locations
In New York, there are several places collecting supplies.

o   Casabe Senior Houses, 150 E. 121 St., Manhattan, Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

o   El Maestro, Inc., 1300 Southern Blvd, Bronx, Monday through Friday from 2 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Also, firehouses across all five boroughs are accepting donations.

Manhattan

o   Engine 28/ Ladder 11: 242 E. 111th Street, New York, NY 11220 (East Harlem)

o   Engine 95/ Ladder 36: 29 Vermilyea Avenue, New York, NY 10033 (Inwood)

o   Engine 28/ Ladder 11: 222 E. 2nd Street, New York, NY 10009 (Lower East Side)

Bronx

o   EMS Station 26: 1264 Boston Road, Bronx NY 10456 (Morrisania)

o   EMS Station 55: 3134 Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10451 (Melrose)

o   Engine 64/ Ladder 47: 1214 Castle Hill Avenue, Bronx, NY 10462 (Castle Hill)

o   Engine 83/ Ladder 29: 618 E. 138th Street, Bronx, NY 10454 (Mott Haven/South Bronx)

Queens

o   Engine 316: 27-12 Kearney Street, Queens, NY 11369 (East Elmhurst)

o   Engine 289/ Ladder 138: 97-28 43rd Avenue, Queens, NY 11368 (Corona)

o   Engine 307/ Ladder 154: 81-17 Northern Boulevard, Queens, NY 11372 (Jackson Heights)

Brooklyn

o   Engine 271/ Ladder 124: 392 Himrod Street, Brooklyn, NY 11237 (Bushwick)

o   Engine 277/ Ladder 112: 582 Knickerbocker Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11221 (Bushwick)

o   Engine 201/ Ladder 114: 5113 4th Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11220 ( Sunset Park)

o   Engine 228: 436 39th Street, Brooklyn, NY 11232 (Sunset Park)

o   Engine 218: 650 Hart Street, Brooklyn, NY 11221 (Bushwick)

Staten Island

o   Engine 153/ Ladder 77: 74 Broad Street, Staten Island, NY 10304 (Stapleton)

o   Engine 157/ Ladder 80: 1573 Castleton Avenue, Staten Island, NY 10302 (Port Richmond)

o   Ladder 79: 1189 Castleton Avenue, Staten Island, NY 10310 (Port Richmond)

7.     Hurricane Maria Children’s Relief Fund

Save the Children offers emergency assistance to children and families.

Donate here.

8.     Maria Fund
This fun, run by the Center for Popular Democracy, is raising money for local, grassroots organizations. “One hundred percent of monies raised will be used to support immediate relief, recovery, and equitable rebuilding in Puerto Rico for the communities hit hardest by the storm,” the site reads. Donate here.

9.     Blood Drive for Hurricane Victims
Coordinadora de Apoyo, Solidaridad y Ayuda (CASA) is hosting a blood drive in Orlando on September 23 and 24. Learn more here.

10.  Paz Para La Mujer
Paz Para La Mujer is taking both donations and supplies. Learn more here.

11.  Carmelo Anthony Puerto Rico Relief Fund
In a Player’s Tribune piece, Carmelo Anthony announced that he began a YouCaring page to raise $1 million. “Puerto Rico is very near and dear to my heart,” Anthony wrote. “Through my foundation, I have been actively working to bring hope and improve the lives of under-served communities on the island. Hurricane Maria has caused catastrophic damage in Puerto Rico and the residents will need our help and support to rebuild. Please join me in raising the necessary funds to get the much-needed supplies and assistance to the people of Puerto Rico. Your generous donations are tax deductible and greatly appreciated.”

Donate here.

12.  Save a Sato
As we work to help the victims of Hurricane Maria, we can’t forget about animals as well. Save a Sato needs food for animals. Send packages to Parcelas Falu #459 C, Call 35, San Juan, Puerto Rico 00924.

13.  Dogma Bakery

Those in the DMV area can donate items to Dogma Bakery, a gourmet dog bakery and boutique. The bakery is making a trip to Puerto Rico on Saturday. It’s collecting items for dogs but also cleaning supplies.

14.  Voices for Puerto Rico
Gina Rodriguez, Benicio del Toro, Rosie Perez, Luis Guzmán, and more are using their celebrity to draw attention to what’s happening in Puerto Rico. They have joined forces to launch Voices for Puerto Rico, an initiative to raise money for Puerto Ricans affected by Hurricane Maria. The proceeds will go to several organizations, including Niños Nueva Esperanza, Taller Salud, Casa Pueblo, and other brigades.

Donate here.

 

Can We Get There from Here? Stalling on the Path to Species Survival…or Not

You can find just about any message you’d like to hear about climate change. The gloomiest of fatalists: “It’s too late; we’re doomed; party on.” The science denier: “It’s the greatest hoax ever to deceive the American public; those scientists are just making these claims to get grants.” The suburban consumer: “It’s not my problem; is the mall down that one-way street? I need a new engine for my power boat.” The corporate ‘environmentalist’: “Buy more solar panels now!” Or the agri-business CEO, “corn-based ethanol is the renewable fuel we need, and it’s Roundup-Ready.” And on, and on…

So, what’s your message? Or, more to the point, what message do you believe and what are you willing to do about it? How about: “Global climate disruption is moving much faster than we expected. We must act decisively and quickly. We must demand that our so-called leaders initiate major national and international programs for climate-disruption mitigation and adaptation, now. But we must also realize how difficult that will be, since Congress is owned by the corporate, financial, and military elites who profit from the dying fossil fuel economy.

Facing Facts

In any case we need to take every action we can now in our local communities, since it is at least possible to influence local decisions. Otherwise, enough simply cannot be done before real climate catastrophes occur around the world. Many such regional climate disruptions will lead to societal collapse, mass starvation, climate-driven migrations, resource wars, and general chaos. “I’d really like a new swimming pool in my backyard like my neighbor’s, but maybe I ought to put in new weather stripping around those leaky doors and insulate the walls and ceilings in this old house. I could contact that local 350.org group and help them persuade the college to divest its endowment from fossil fuel investments.”  Or?

Many such actions can be taken. The “I can’t make a difference; I’m only one person,” excuse doesn’t cut it. Anyone with a basic understanding of what is happening is morally bound to act in whatever way they can. Without major human intervention into the degrading environmental conditions that humans have caused, we will soon experience the most devastating breakdowns of living earth systems not yet quite imaginable. To think otherwise is sheer folly – utopian delusions that only serve to further enrich the elites before the whole system collapses. As James Gustave Speth put it, “Soon it will be abundantly clear that it is business as usual that is utopian, whereas creating something very new and different is a practical necessity.”*

Replacing Business as Usual

Well, “business as usual” happens to be extractive corporate capitalism thinly disguised as Adam Smith’s small community freeholder individual entrepreneur capitalism that briefly existed at the dawn of the Industrial Age. “The Capitalism We Have” is a massive leviathan of environmental destruction and human exploitation. It is a politically subsidized corporate system for dominating the world economy. It’s goal is to concentrate wealth in the hands of the financial and corporate elites at the expense of the people and the planet. It extracts everything it can from the earth and produces as much waste as it can get away with. Via the corporate owned mass media it promotes its ideology of neo-liberal (laisse faire) economics of plunder and exploitation without restraint. Its political power prevents any serious reform, such as was modestly attempted in response to the Great Depression of the 1930’s with modest success before being cut off by political actions of the financial elite. Popular access to the national political process is virtually cut off. Most people know that something is very wrong but are largely cut off from real answers because of corporate control of most media.

The ideological debate was never won. Neither the socialism that was nor the capitalism we have reflects much about the ideological imaginaries of that debate. I have to conclude that the debate itself was entirely irrelevant as an exercise in seeking truth; it is pointless to pursue. It was only a weapon in struggles for power between private corporatism and state collectivism. What matters now is the real system that operates most of the world economy today. That system is trans-national corporate capitalism, which skillfully exploits the ideologies of individual freedom and entrepreneurial innovation and “small business” to cement ever more centralized corporate control of the politics and economics of most societies today.

The Path to Survival

Interestingly, despite all that corporate power over the economy, politics, and culture, more and more people realize that the system is not working for us or for the planet. Sure, many see no personal path to help right the system. But many in various sectors are taking actions in their own local interests and that is a good start. One of the most important steps now is to coalesce the range of movements for social and environmental change into a coherent worldwide movement working for a new Great Transformation that can save the living earth systems upon which we all depend.  That transformation will evolve as we struggle to fix the damage we have done and prevent as much further damage as possible.  The result, if we are lucky, will be a far more humane world.
_______
* James Gustave Speth, The Bridge at the Edge of the World: Capitalism, the Environment, and Crossing from Crisis to Sustainability. New Haven: Caravan Books, 2008.

The Dilemma of Transformation: From Petro-Economy to Eco-Society

What will it will take to reduce world carbon emissions enough in the short time necessary to fend off the worst of the effects of climate disruption? So much of the economy and energy technology is involved that it is hard to even imagine the magnitude of resulting social disruption.

Yet here we are, faced with such colossal dilemmas that any serious student of the climate crisis is easily overwhelmed. Where to start? Everywhere. How much to do? Everything. But priorities must be set and optimal sequences of action must be developed. Here are some of the key dilemmas.

Individual change
“If everyone would just stop driving so much and using all those plastic drink-bottles…,” etc. Well, yes, many everyday behaviors will have to change if we are to even stop the continuing growth in carbon emissions, no less reverse the trend. But a serious consideration of the colossal scale at which many things must happen, the means to accomplish them appear perplexing at best.

Human habits would be hard enough to change without the social pressure to consume in our current manner. Beyond that, little exists in the way of a model for “responsible” ecological behavior. Besides, most folks barely have time to get the dishes done before work the next morning to spend a lot of time thinking about such things. I have always been a strong advocate for education, even as I saw its quality slide over the past 40 years in the U.S. But something much faster and more intense is needed.

Leadership AWOL
“George W. Obama,” someone called the equivocating “environmental president” who, as Naomi Klein put it the other day, just can’t bring himself to just say no to the dangerously destructive Keystone XL pipeline. Meanwhile, The Congress-of-No reeks of a vulgar racism that is willing to cost America whatever it takes to prevent “Obama” (the title “President” deliberately missing) from accomplishing anything at all. And as the rest of the world puzzles over how to respond to the growing climate crisis, U.S. Congress members wallow in sanctimonious denial. Their minds and their morals: Absent Without Leave.

Leadership in responding to climate disruption would take both recognition and bold public articulation of the catastrophic nature of the planetary climate emergency. Real leadership would entail mounting a major operation to mobilize all the major economic institutions to respond to the crisis. Each corporate and government sector should be required to develop plans for immediate ramping up of a maximal conversion of all energy systems. No special deals. If you are waiting for that you might as well plan for societal collapse; that is where the AWOL “leadership” is taking us.

So, leadership can only come from the “grass roots,” not just in individual ‘lifestyle’ changes – which must accompany economic, industrial, and technological conversions. Grass-roots leadership must force the restructuring of all the major institutions, public and private/corporate, that drive the fossil-fuel economy. Many local community actions, such as public banking, local non-chemical agriculture and small manufacture, etc., are needed, now. But the ultimate and proximate necessity is for large scale institutional transformations. These can only come from broad popularly supported collective demands upon the larger system. That will come when the crisis is sufficiently severe. But will it be soon enough?

Collective Action
Some sociologists specialize in studying “collective behavior and social movements.” Crowds, mobs, fashion, riots, rebellions, all have certain characteristics that distinguish them from everyday actions and normal social processes. Ordinary norms and beliefs are suspended as a collective recognition of special circumstances arises. That can be good or bad, depending on the situation and collective definitions of it. In context of natural disasters, sometimes whole communities have spontaneously risen up and responded to crises with highly organized mutual aid. Or, a riot can be a collective act of spontaneously organized destruction. Anti-colonial liberation movements resulted from a another form of collective consciousness. It all depends on the level and focus of awareness and collective definition of the situation.

But the climate crisis is somewhat different. It has emerged as an ecological consequence of the multiple converging crises of economics, politics, and expanded capital investment in extractive technologies of overproduction. Its scope is so broad, yet its impact is often very local and also episodic. A super storm here, a drought there, a super-hot wildfire or raging flood somewhere else, a lot of species extinctions everywhere. At the early stages the effects were diverse and diffuse. That does not lend itself to collective recognition or a focus for action. That must come from science, and science is something too many people are unfamiliar with and have been indoctrinated to mistrust. But the scientific evidence is now so clear that it constitutes a call for action.

Unprecedented Social Mobilization
The immediate dilemma is that deep and comprehensive structural change is needed on a very large scale and very quickly. But massive change will only happen when enormous numbers of people demand it. “National leadership” is unavailable; it serves the corporate state, the very source of these converging crises. Oddly, massive mobilization, which is driven by recognition and emotion, may be easier to launch than education.

This Changes Everything,” as Naomi Klein’s new book title accurately proclaims the essence of the climate crisis. But such immense transformation of all fundamental human systems requires complex coordination too – much akin to the rapid mobilization initiated on the U.S. entering WW II, but on an enormously larger scale. The social mobilization needed to effectively respond to the climate crisis must be national and international as well as local. But people in places are the only hope for launching such an unprecedented multifaceted human social mobilization to avoid extinction.

So a massive social mobilization is unequivocally necessary. It has happened before on a much smaller scale – the civil rights struggle, anti-apartheid movement, Poland, India, even Argentina in a sense, and with varying ‘success’ – but it is highly unpredictable and difficult. We are in for quite a ride….