Joy of Dog III

At first, twice a day at the dog park was barely enough to burn off a good portion of Copper’s seemingly boundless puppy-energy. For a while, it was a bit of a chore, but fun to watch her run and play with the other dogs. We discovered a whole culture of human social organization at the dog park too, but that is another story, a reflection of other larger scale social relations and problems of the nation and the planet.

The social life of dogs is much more complex than one might imagine without experiencing their interaction at the dog park. It was especially good to find other puppies at the dog park who could match Copper’s energy. She learned the ropes and soon became quite popular among the other dogs at the park, mostly because of her enthusiasm and friendliness.

Dog Society

Copper could match any other dog’s energy and playfulness, and her disposition is so sweet that all the other dogs like her – except those two aggressive poodles, whose owner exhibited a total lack of responsibility for her dogs and simply refused to control them. That is also another story in itself. But Copper tolerated even a level of aggressiveness that would offend and repel most other dogs. It just occurred to me, those poodles remind me of Trump.

Puppy play pose_Copper and Django

Copper playing with Django

Generally, dogs socialize newcomers in the etiquette of play, which in some ways mimics the behavior patterns of the hunt. In their wrestling, they often pin one another down, engaging in mock battle, appearing to bite one another’s throat as if to kill. In that behavior, they acknowledge the mutual trust that is inherent in allowing another dog to wrap her/his big jaws around one’s throat. However, it is “mouthing,” not actual biting with what could be a lethal instrument. Mouthing is also a sign of affection expressed toward their human “masters.” For dogs, the primary instrument for engaging with the world is their mouth – their closest analog to our opposable thumb.

Socializing and Play

On a good day, up to twenty dogs of all varieties and sizes may appear at the 1-acre fenced area, covered with a blanket of wood chips. The etiquette (and lack thereof on the part of a few) regarding human responsibility for dogs and their waste, mirrors the culture of civility versus the culture of waste and indifference in the larger society.

I had owned several dogs over the years, but when I was a kid, nobody I knew had ever heard of such a thing as a dog park. I ran, walked, and played with my dogs in the yard, the neighborhood, and sometimes at the beach or a neighborhood park. The dog park is another world entirely. Copper took to it as she had taken to the water on the coast near Baja California del Sur when she was a small pup.

Personality

Now, Copper enthusiastically swims out to me through the surf at a deserted beach on the west coast of mainland Mexico; I swear she likes body surfing, just as I did as a kid in Southern California. In the calm waters at the beach at Rincon de Guayabitos, she loves to swim out among the moored boats, chasing after gulls and pelicans as far out as fifty yards before I call her back.

Copper’s favorite playmates tend to be the young dogs of her approximate age and energy, although her energy level surpasses that of almost every dog she encounters. When her playmate might tire and withdraw from the high-energy wrestling and running, Copper sometimes starts barking impatiently, demanding more play. As it turns out, Vizslas mature slowly and continue to exhibit puppy characteristic until four or even five years. She is four and a half now, and clearly retains some of that ‘puppiness.’ However, she will always be a “fun dog.”

Joy of Dog II

Copper has an on-off switch. Two positions: full speed ahead and sleep soundly.

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Copper luxuriating in our Durango Hotel room, Winter 2016.

 

Even when she’s being “bad,” stealing sox or slippers and playing keep away with anything she knows I want back, it’s all about having fun. Humans should be so free. Vizslas don’t fully mature until four or five. At four, she still has some of her puppy perspective. She is smart, strong-willed, and just charming enough to get her way…too often. Playful would be a monumental understatement.

Copper was only a few months old when we took her with us to visit friends staying near La Paz, Baja Del Sur, Mexico, four years ago. There, we drove to a deserted beach, planning to introduce her to water. La Paz faces east on the Sea of Cortez. The surf is very small. I waded out to coax Copper in hopes she would learn to swim. Immediately she swam right out to me, circled, and then swam back to shore, looking bewildered, yet excited. All I had to do was call her and she repeated the feat, over and over again. At 6 months, she had more to learn about swimming, but her unbounded energy and enthusiasm guaranteed success. Today, she is an accomplished surf-dog who loves playing in the surf as I did as a kid on the California coast so many decades before. (More on that in a later post.)

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Surf Dog

We were stunned to realize how much Copper loves to run. Each day while in La Paz, we took Copper to a deserted beach. Cynde and I would separate by about 50 or 75 yards along the shore and called her back and forth. We thought she would never tire. Finally, she sat down and looked in both directions as if to say, “Okay, guys, that’s it for me.”

In a couple of minutes, she was back at it. Right then we decided that taking her on walks around the neighborhood as we had done before the trip, was clearly not adequate to her running needs. She is, after all, a Vizsla, a field dog with remarkable energy and endurance.

The Fog of Play

Fog of Play

We take Copper to the dog park daily, even twice a day for the first few months, just to help burn off all that energy having fun. Copper easily learned to socialize with the other dogs and relished the appearance of other puppies with whom she could wrestle and chase. At the dog park, we would learn much more about dog social life and the humans who “own” them than we ever could have imagined.

The dog park has a way of bringing out the best and worst in people (mostly the best), highlighting the human dilemmas that make it so difficult to face both interpersonal and global crises. New revelations about the joy of dog awaited her two-footed companions at the dog park.