Mind of a Rapist

Rape is a violent crime of domination. Violence, of course, is the ultimate act of domination. We tend to see violence as an act of physical force leading to either physical injury or death, and it often is. But violence can also take on more subtle forms.

Not all domination directly entails physical force. Some forms of dominance involve mental violence. Spousal abuse, as well as sexual harassment, can take social psychological forms involving no physical act. Some forms of abuse consist mainly of “degradation rituals.” Trump is a master of ritual degradation.

Domination often comes under the “color of authority,” whether physically violent or not. When abusers lead large organizations, the result is often institutionalized degradation of whole populations or vulnerable communities. Elites often subject whole classes of victims to exploitation for profit. So-called “authorities” too often exhibit sociopathic tendencies in their “enforcement” of rules, regulations, or laws.

Sociopathy Empowered

Rapists, like all sociopaths, seek to exercise power by any means necessary to control and exploit their victims. Many power-seekers use their aggression to gain social, economic, or political power. It is not surprising, therefore, that a greater percentage of people in positions of authority are sociopaths than in the general population. Bullies typically begin their abuse at an early age.

Whether he is drunk or not, a seventeen-year-old who attempts to rape a fifteen-year-old exhibits sociopathic behavior; he is a rapist. We should not dismiss such bullying as a mere youthful indiscretion. Instead, attempted rape reflects a deep personality disorder that is not likely to change in adulthood.

However, many sociopaths disguise their lack of empathy within aggressive acts once they become executives, jurists, or politicians who have great power over others. Sophisticated bullies often disguise their ruthless exercise of power as the mere execution of legal principals. We can find bullies in all economic classes, of course. But those who rise within economic and political elites pose a far greater danger to society than any street hustler.

Most experts on sociopathy/psychopathy agree that it is not a curable condition. While sociopaths learn to appear to conform to social norms of civility and even kindness, they actually have little or no empathy for others. Some more severe cases engage in ruthless Trumpery and, while they demand absolute loyalty from their associates, they do not hesitate to “throw them under the bus” if that is convenient. We have too many examples of that emanating from the highest political office in the land.

Many sociopaths adapt to their social surroundings by deploying a practiced charm. As a result, they become quite successful, especially if they went to elite prep schools and universities. In such higher social strata, they develop connections with the sons and daughters of other well-connected families, which they use throughout their careers.

The Career Rapist

It is not unusual for men from wealthy families, who have a need to dominate others, to occupy high offices. Such men often cling to a set of political beliefs that reflect their obsessive desire to dominate, disparage, and dismiss the rights of vulnerable minority peoples. They often advocate for laws that oppress minorities (and women) even further. Too often, they have successful careers.

Sociopaths just do not feel whole if they fail to dominate others from groups they see as weaker and therefore undeserving of respect or rights. That is why fascists are also racists and racists have authoritarian personalities so similar to those of fascists. Nor is it particularly surprising that sociopaths, who usually also display elements of narcissism, express their need to dominate by one form of sexual predation or another. Executive power affords so many opportunities for sexual harassment in male-dominated organizations.

Rape of Democracy

170px-Brett_Michael_Kavanaugh_(2004)Many abusers avoid public exposure for decades. A few, when subject to close scrutiny, such as in a vetting process when nominated for high office, say, Supreme Court justice may be finally exposed. That sends an already corrupt “advise and consent” process into a tailspin with politicians running in all directions for cover.

The accuser is doubly victimized when political allies of the “closet predator” dismiss the claims of a female victim, by using various forms of sexist derision and patronizing innuendo, all while feigning the concern for “giving her a fair hearing.” Anita Hill was the classic victim of such sociopathic politics.

Entrenched politicians see it all as “just politics.” Since many politicians have sociopathic tendencies themselves, those who are allies of the perpetrator rally to his defense using every available discounting and delegitimizing technique they can muster.

In the political realm, when all this happens, another unacknowledged victim of rape is Democracy herself.

Predators Like Us

Leave it to a practicing member of an indigenous culture to “say it like it is,” in the most direct way imaginable. I had watched a very interesting episode of “Nature” on PBS (January 28, 2015), about the incursion of killer whales into the Arctic seas. It got me thinking of the predatory practices of ‘Man’ in the world, writ small and large. The arrival of killer whales – Orcas – happened because of the warming of those waters due to human induced global warming. The disruption of local ecologies has not been caused by human predation by indigenous hunters. Instead, humans have plundered various components of the earth’s systems on a planetary scale, with increasingly obvious destabilizing effects.

The killer whales are hunters, perhaps the most effective hunting species in all the oceans of the planet. Their effectiveness is largely due to their highly complex communication and coordination in trapping and dispatching their prey. Orcas are among the very smartest mammals of the sea. They have played their predator role in balanced oceanic ecologies for a very long time. But now, planetary scale human environmental predation has resulted in climate changes that allow the Orcas to range much farther north than ever before. They now reach into arctic seas where they had never before ventured. Such changes have consequences.

The hunting practices of killer whales since their Arctic incursion have altered the ecology of the region. In talking with the PBS film makers, an Inuit hunter commented on the effects of the arrival of killer whales in his hunting grounds in a very matter of fact way. The Orcas attack Narwhal (Monodon monoceros), a medium sized predatory whale that feeds primarily on small deep-water flatfish and codfish. The Narwhal is a critical component of the Inuit diet. Because of its rapier like snout protruding like a horn, Narwhals are called the “unicorn of the sea.” With only about 75,000 in existence, primarily in the Arctic, they are classified as ‘near threatened” with extinction. With the incursion of Orcas into the arctic and their prodigious group hunting skills incorporating military-like strategy, Narwhals survival as a species could be more severely threatened.

The Inuit hunter casually commented, “They are predators like us.” That got me to thinking of the many and various ways humans are indeed quite predatory creatures. In the past, and still today for some indigenous peoples in various locations around the globe, humans are predators. Within a particular region their predations are mostly in balance with the other elements of the local ecology. In some other settings humans may be primarily pastoralists or agrarian peoples rather than hunters. Industrialists, on the other hand, are primarily predators, but their prey are not limited to animal populations. They (we) prey upon the land itself and extract all manner of materials and organisms needed for industrial processes.

In some regions where severe drought or other climate changes have disrupted a local ecosystem, indigenous groups may over-hunt or over fish. They may also over harvest forests, just like the Easter Islanders did, severely damaging the ecosystem upon which they depend for survival. But the Inuit, human predators in the arctic, did not disrupt the ecological balance between Narwhal, and Orca – there never was one. Before climate changes allowed their northern migration, Orcas were not part of that ecology. Instead, it is the predatory extractive practices of modern industrial societies far away that have altered the relationships between arctic species, including humans.

World industrial economic waste has changed climate conditions so that an external species could enter the arctic ecosystem, disrupting its former balance. All the long term local consequences of this ecological disruption will not be known immediately. It is likely, however, that at minimum local Inuit hunters will be forced to adapt to a declining Narwhal population. Similar situations are occurring all over the world. The particulars in each case are different. But the process is the same.

Planetary climate disruption has diverse local effects, from drought to floods to more powerful storms to changed water temperature and ocean acidity. These changes can alter species relations either with each other or with changed conditions of their environment. In each case the result is the same: increasing rates of species extinctions. [“Climate deniers” seem incapable of thinking of complex systems or consequences of interactive changes within or among them.]

The industrial age was born of a culture that perceived humanity as separate and apart from nature and preordained to dominate it. Western industrial culture was launched and is driven by the belief that is it destined to control the natural world. Such beliefs, or very similar ones, are now held worldwide. Yet the world industrial system is just past its peak. The near exhaustion of resources to extract, the record concentration of wealth, the faltering of the world financial system all collide, producing chaos. They both cause and combine with the tipping point of earth-systems destabilization to form the greatest crisis of human survival ever. The world economic growth machine has hit the wall.

The earth systems that could sustain industry at smaller scale as innovative technologies accelerated exploitation of limited resources are now being destabilized. Contrary to the ideology of individual free will in an economy of ever-expanding opportunity, Mother Earth presents us with a very limited choice. Either adapt to the realities of earth-systems limits or die. To survive we have but one choice. Human populations must radically change the ways we live in the real world by abandoning the illusions we have held to for centuries.